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Take Your Training To The Next Level – A 5K Run Take Your Training To The Next Level – A 5K Run
by Keila Chaliotis, Staff Writer Have you ever thought about taking your running to another level? How about a new challenge experience like running... Take Your Training To The Next Level – A 5K Run

by Keila Chaliotis, Staff Writer

Have you ever thought about taking your running to another level?
How about a new challenge experience like running a 5K? When you think about it in digits with the word miles followed after them, it may seem like something difficult to do, but 3.1 miles is really not that much of a distance difficult to accomplish and with the proper training, it can be a fun and rewarding experience, even more if it is your first time.
Yes, even though this is the shortest distance for running races, it will still require you to do adequate training and preparation. All depending on your level of fitness and your goal, the type of training plan you choose to follow is sure to vary.
About The Race:5K run
Just about in any town or city across the United States, you are more than likely to find a wide number of 5K races throughout the year. This distance is one that attracts a lot of beginner runners. There are more kid and veteran runners in this form of racing than pro runners because preparing for it does not require as much time as training for a half-marathon or marathon. Which is why it makes it appealing to busy scheduled parents, students and hard working professionals.
In one hand, you have the common beginner whose goal is to only finish the race, while in the other hand, an experienced runner may have a certain goal time in mind. Whatever the goal may be, training properly is important.
Time For Training:
Just like with any exercise program, getting ready for a 5K should be done bit by bit. It is important to build up a level of cardiovascular endurance as well as muscular strength and endurance in order to allow your body’s every muscle to adjust safely for the trip. Now, depending on your level of fitness before starting a 5K training plan, you should allow 7 to 10 weeks to build up to running for up to 30 minutes, which is the about the time it will take a beginner to complete a 5K. Do not try to train for a shorter period of time for it may not be enough time to strengthen your legs and your lungs. Now, if you already have a good level of fitness from other sports like swimming and running, you may be able to do so in 3 to 5 weeks.
Building Your Base:
When you first start a 5K-training regimen, you should be able to walk at a quick pace for 15 minutes per mile in about 30 minutes. If this is not possible for you, you should focus on building your walking distance first. When you reach the point in which you are ready to add running to your workout, do so bit by bit with a mixture of walking and running.
Here is a little suggested form to prepare; run for 2 minutes followed by walking for 4 minutes and repeating it 5 times for a total of 30 minutes. As you make progress each week, bit by bit reduce the walking time while increasing the running time until you are able to run for 30 consecutive minutes.
Laying Out A Training Plan:
You should use variety for your training throughout the week, for this is the key to a successful 5K training plan. My advice to you is to run three days a week and walk one to two days a week. On the other days, you should rest in order to give your muscles time to recover and get ready to run again. Also, try out a bit by bit increase in your running distance over the course of the 7 or 5 weeks starting with a 1.5-mile run and building it up to 3 miles.
Here is a running routine I came up with that could be useful for those of you who are beginners:

5K_table
Week 1
Monday:
Walk quickly for 1 mile, Run 2 minutes every half mile until you reach 3.5 total miles, and then walk for the last 0.5 mile.
Tuesday:
Walk for 3 to 5 miles.
Wednesday:
Take the day off
Thursday: 
Walk 1 mile, run 3 minutes every half mile until you reach 3.5 miles, and walk for the last 0.5 mile.
Friday:
Take the day off
Saturday:
Walk 3 to 5 miles, including 10 run/walk intervals like, run 30 seconds, walk 1 minute, in the last mile.
Sunday: 
Take the day off
Total miles for the week: 16 to 20
Week 2
Monday: 
Walk 1.5 miles, run 5 minutes, walk 5 minutes; do it for 3 times, and walk 1 to 2 miles.
Tuesday:
Walk 3 to 5 miles.
Wednesday: 
Take the day off
Thursday:
Walk 1 mile, run 3 minutes every half mile until you reach 3.5 miles, and walk for the last 0.5 mile.
Friday:
Take the day off
Saturday: 
Walk 1.5 miles, run 5 minutes, walk 5 minutes; do it for 3 times, and walk 1 to 2 miles.
Sunday: 
Take the day off
Total of miles for the week: 18 to 20
Week 3
Monday:
Walk 1.5 miles, run 10 minutes, walk 5 to 7 minutes, run 10 minutes, walk 5 to 7 minutes.
Tuesday: 
Walk 3 to 5 miles.
Wednesday: 
Take the day off
Thursday:
Walk 3 to 5 miles.
Friday:
Take the day off
Saturday: 
Walk 1.5 miles, run 10 minutes, walk 5 minutes, run 5 minutes, walk 5 minutes, run 10 minutes, and walk 5 to 10 minutes.
Sunday: 
Take the day off
Total of miles for the week: 16 to 20
Week 4
Monday: 
Walk 1 mile, run 3 minutes, walk 2 minutes; do a total of 10 times, and walk 5 minutes.
Tuesday: 
Walk 1 mile, run 15 minutes, walk 5 minutes, run 15 minutes, and walk 5 minutes.
Wednesday:
Take the day off
Thursday:
Walk 1 mile, run 5 minutes, walk 2 minutes; do that 7-minute sequence 5 times, and walk 5 minutes.
Friday:
Take the day off
Saturday: 
Walk 1 mile, run 10 minutes, walk 5 minutes, and do that 15-minute sequence 3 times.
Sunday:
Take the day off
Total miles for the week: 17.5 miles
Week 5
Monday: 
Walk 1 mile, run 3 minutes, walk 2 minutes, do that 5-minute sequence a total of 10 times, and  walk 5 minutes.
Tuesday:
Walk 1 mile, run 20 minutes, walk 5 minutes, run 20 minutes, and walk 5 minutes.
Wednesday: 
Take the day off
Thursday: 
Walk 1 mile, run 5 minutes, walk 2 minutes; do that 7-minute sequence 5 times, and walk 5 minutes.
Friday:
Take the day off
Saturday:
Walk 1 mile, run 15 minutes, walk 5 minutes; do that 20-minute sequence 3 times.
Sunday:
Take the day off
Total miles for the week: 20 miles
Well, there you have it. These five weeks of training will be enough to do the trick, but if you need more than 5 weeks, just re-adjust the numbers to your liking, but do not cheat yourself by spreading it too much.
Here Is A Quick Tip For You:
Get a running partner. If he/she is slower than you, center yourself on perfecting your stride by landing lightly on your heels, then rolling forward to push off on your toes. If he/she is faster, pushing yourself beyond your comfort zone one or two days per week will help you get stronger. But the best of this buddy system is, that distraction and conversation will help the miles fly by!

Clemdog