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How to Measure Your Workout Intensity How to Measure Your Workout Intensity
Not only exercising but doing it the right way is a very important function of a healthy body. A half hour per day six... How to Measure Your Workout Intensity

Not only exercising but doing it the right way is a very important function of a healthy body. A half hour per day six days a week should do the trick and keep you on the right track. Rest is also very important so make sure to get plenty of it on your day off from the workout so that your body can repair and strengthen. It is also important to keep an eye on how you feel during your workouts and to monitor your heart rate to measure your intensity level.

It is also important to keep an eye on how you feel during your workouts

It is also important to keep an eye on how you feel during your workouts

According to the Mayo Clinic, when beginning your warm up exercises you should have no problems and they should be easy to do. Also no noticeable changes should occur to your breathing and no perspiration should arise and you should also be able to talk and sing freely without any panting.

Now moderate exercise will feel harder and you should notice a slight increase in your breathing and you should also be able to talk but not sing also perspiration should start to develop on your body. Now strong exercising should feel challenging and your breathing will be rapid and deep with a steady amount of sweat occurring and you should be able to say a few words without taking a breath.

Light and effortless warm-ups exercises should give you a heart rate between 50 and 60 % of your maximum heart rate or beats per minute (You can very easily check your own Target Heart Rate with this easy method of subtracting your age from 220 or for women 226, and this will be your heart rate).  Moderate exercise will give you a heart rate between 60 and 70 % of your maximum heart rate and strong exercise should give you a heart rate between 70 and 80 % of your maximum heart rate.  Any exercise over your maximum heart rate should be reduced and calculated carefully.  Exercise that only gives you a heart rate below your maximum heart rate will be a waste of your time.

 Moderate exercise will give you a heart rate between 60 and 70 % of your maximum heart rate

Moderate exercise will give you a heart rate between 60 and 70 % of your maximum heart rate

 

Remember that a proper diet and sleep cycle will have a great effect on your overall performance during your workout and if proper care and maintenance is maintained you will have no problem achieving proper monitoring to keep you on track.